1More wired in-ear headphone reviews: Do more drivers equal better performance?

I’ve been a big fan of 1More in-ear headphones (IEH) ever since I reviewed the company’s Stylish True Wireless model for Macworld. In addition, I wrote about the 1More Triple Driver wired IEH that is given to VIP attendees at Aerosmith’s Las Vegas residency in my coverage of that event for TechHive. 1More offers other models of wired in-ear headphones, including the Dual Driver and Quad Driver, which led me to wonder if more drivers equal better performance. I asked 1More to send me a Dual Driver and a Quad Driver, so I could compare them with the Triple Driver I had from the Aerosmith concert. The sound quality of all three is quite good, but in a direct side-by-side comparison, the Triple and Quad Driver models edge out the Dual Driver. The Triple Driver has the best sound of the three in-ear headphones under consideration here. It also has the thickest wires. The first thing you might wonder is, why bother with wired in-ear headphones? True Wireless models, such as the 1More Stylish, have no wires to get tangled, and they are quickly gaining popularity, especially since many modern mobile devices have ditched their headphone jack in favor of Bluetooth. Well, for one thing, i...

The power grid is a complicated beast, regardless of where you live. Power plants have to

The power grid is a complicated beast, regardless of where you live. Power plants have to send energy to all of their clients at a constant frequency and voltage (regardless of the demand at any one time), and to do that they need a wide array of equipment. From transformers and voltage regulators to line reactors and capacitors, breakers and fuses, and solid-state and specialized mechanical relays, almost every branch of engineering can be found in the power grid. Of course, we shouldn’t leave out the most obvious part of the grid: the wires that actually form the grid itself. There are typically two types of power lines that make up the grid, which can be divided based on their function. One group consists of smaller, lower-voltage lines (under 30 kV in most situations) which deliver power to homes and businesses. These are known as distribution lines, and can be buried underground in newer neighborhoods or are strung on smaller poles around 40 feet in height. The number of energy-carrying wires on them is three or fewer (per circuit, some distribution poles carry more than one three-phase circuit) and they tend to hold other equipment on them as well, such as transformers, fu...