This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules. Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Chanalee Fischer Schlisser, the owner of The Challah Fairy in New City, talks about her variety of challah. Mark Vergari, mvergari@lohud.com Challah, honey, family, faith: Such are some of the mainstays of Rosh Hashana, one of the holiest days in the Jewish religion. The holiday, which marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year, begins the evening of Sept. 29 and ends the evening of Oct. 1 and is both a time of rejoicing and of serious introspection. Chanalee Fischer Schlisser, the owner of The Challah Fairy in New City, is pictured with a variety of her challah, including crumb, plain and raisin, Sept. 20, 2019.  (Photo: Mark Vergari/The Journal News) But before all that reflecting and and praying comes eating. And that means buying (or making) a light, fluffy challah, usually shaped round this time of year to symbolize the eternal cycle of life. The challah is traditionally dipped in honey, symbolizing hopes for a sweet New Year.  Crumb, plain and raisin challah are pictured at The Challah Fairy in New City, Sept. 20, 2019.  (Photo: Mark Vergari/T...