Upon perusing F/W 19 fashion week photos and recognizing that crossbody bags were back in style,

Upon perusing F/W 19 fashion week photos and recognizing that crossbody bags were back in style, my heart skipped a beat. Don’t get me wrong (I love a good top-top-handle or bucket bag), but the idea of having an extra free hand thrills me. Think about all the possibilities! Carrying my matcha latte without fear of spilling, grabbing my metro card from my bag with ease, texting with two hands instead of one thumb? The list could go on. Not only that, but I deem crossbody bags to be incredibly chic. With a shortened strap thrown over both shoulders and the bag positioned directly under your chest, the style takes on a fashion twist, differentiating it from the unfortunate satchels I wore in middle school. If you feel genuine delight at the thought of a hands-free accessory, scroll through for the top 10 designer crossbody bags (and their vintage counterparts) fall has to offer. I would be prepared to argue that Saint Laurent makes the queen of all crossbody bags. Sleek and simple with the iconic YSL logo ever-present, the gold-chain Vicky bag takes you from day to night with just the flutter of an eyelash. Burnished with the new TB monogram, this bag reflects the polished elevati...

The Rothy’s, Allbirds and Everlane flat that has become an obsession

Jennie Chen was the kind of person who’d never spend more than $20 on a pair of shoes. She dug through the clearance racks at off-price chains like Ross and Marshalls, unearthing what she calls “really ugly sneakers” for her hobby competing in dog shows, which can have handlers on their feet for 12 hours at a time, running alongside their canine contestants. “If you’re limping along,” she says, “it’ll affect the dog’s gait.” And because comfort can be the difference between winning and losing, style sometimes takes a back seat. Crocs were a popular choice in the dog show world even before they hit the mainstream. “Nurse shoes,” too, says Chen. “You know what I’m talking about: the ugliest shoes on the face of the planet?” Last year, though, a friend visited and introduced her to a brand that made her rethink her footwear philosophy: Rothy’s, a San Francisco-based shoe startup that makes flats with supersoft knitted uppers that come in dozens of colors, textures, and patterns. The silhouettes are simple — the round and pointed-toe ballet flats are distinguishable mostly by their V-shape vamps (shoemaking lingo for the part that stretches across the top of the toe) — but these ot...